Posted on

Rain showers don’t deter day two of Floyd County Fair

  • Jalynn Goodale, from Osage, competes with her horse, Joe's Star Valentine, at the Floyd County Fair on Wednesday. Goodale is a member of the 4-H Union Busy Bees. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • Jalynn Goodale, from Osage, competes with her horse, Joe's Star Valentine, at the Floyd County Fair on Wednesday. Goodale is a member of the 4-H Union Busy Bees. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • Judge Jerry Sharer instructs entrants in the horse show on Wednesday at the Floyd County Fair. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • Evan Bjelica and his horse Skittles compete in the Floyd County Fair Wednesday. Bjelica is a member of the 4-H Jolly Ranchers. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • Lynn Hoeft competes in Senior Showmanship Halter with her horse JLC Patches of Gold. Hoeft is a member of the Riverton Lucky Clovers. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • The horse show was moved inside because of rain showers on Wednesday at the Floyd County Fair. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

  • Lillian Stough competes at the Floyd County Fair on Wednesday. Press photo by Kelly Terpstra

By Kelly Terpstra, kterpstra@charlescitypress.com

The sun poked through the clouds late Wednesday afternoon during day two of the Floyd County Fair just outside Charles City.

It was a welcome reprieve after rain saturated the fairgrounds earlier in the day.

The 4-H and FFA horse show highlighted the fair’s animal competitions Wednesday and went on as scheduled, although it was moved inside to the show arena because of mud outside.

Longtime judge Jerry Sharer said the move inside was also a safety issue. Sharer said he has been judging horse shows for 50 years.

He’s seen a lot in that time.

He offered words of advice for many of the youthful competitors who received blue and red ribbons as a reward for their efforts.

“Just keep going, keep working and you’ll do a better job next time. Participation is the name of the game,” said Sharer, who hails from Jewell.

On a good year, Sharer said, he will hit four or five fairs to judge the particular counties’ equine skills.

“It’s kind of a pick and draw type situation,” he said, making a return trip to Floyd County this summer after judging last year’s show for the first time.

Sharer was happy to see youth getting involved with their animals and taking pride in what they do, win or lose.

“I know the competition-type situation. But it’s enjoyment and the friendships you make down the line that keeps you going,” said Sharer. “You never keep going if you don’t ever start.”

Share
LATEST NEWS